Decimals – Multiplication and Division

These resources offer practice in operating on decimals and, moreover, opportunities to think about the processes of multiplication and division. As stated in the NCTM Focal Points, students should make sense of these procedures, become fluent in performing them, and be able to apply them in solving problems. I believe these sites, as a whole, offer practice in both understanding and problem solving.

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Learning about Multiplication Using Dynamic Sketches of an Area Model
In this applet, a rectangle represents the familiar area model of multiplication. By changing the height of the rectangle, students can explore the effect of multiplying a fixed positive number, in this case 3, by decimal numbers greater than 1 and less than 1. The visual is powerful!

Too Big or Too Small?
Scroll down to Activity 3: Exploring the Effect of Operations on Decimals. Through playing the cleverly crafted game presented here, students explore the effect of operations on decimal numbers. They begin with the number 100 as they enter a maze. For each segment chosen on the maze, the student calculates the assigned operation and number; for example, “+ 1.2” or “x 0.8.” The goal is to choose a path through the maze that results in the largest value at the finish.

Decimals
This site has explanatory lessons and interactive practice on most aspects of decimals, including multiplying decimals and dividing them. A good set of materials for self-tutoring or review. 

Find the Cost of Meat per Week at a Zoo
In a multi-step, NAEP assessment item, students must determine how much a zoo spends each week on meat to feed the animals. The site links to the scoring guide, sample student responses, and data on how well grade 8 students did on this multiplication/division problem. Only 13% solved it correctly!

Where’s the (Decimal) Point? asks students to explain clearly how they know where to put the decimal point in multiplication and in division of decimals. Students must think beyond the “rules” to the “whys.” I suggest these problems as challenges for older middle school students who are ready to stretch their thinking to the level of generalizing arithmetic.


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We want and need your ideas, suggestions, and observations. What would you like to know more about? What questions have your students asked? We invite you to share with us and other readers by posting your comments. Please check back often for our newest posts or download the RSS feed for this blog. Let us know what you think and tell us how we can serve you better. We appreciate your feedback on all of our Middle School Portal 2 publications. You can also email us at msp@msteacher.org. Post updated 11/16/2011.

Fractions: Multiplying and Dividing

Is there anything more difficult to explain at 5th and 6th grade level than the rules for multiplying and dividing fractions? These resources offer support in explaining the concepts that underlie the rules. Visual, interactive models are provided where possible. You will also find opportunities for your students to practice their skills in this area of arithmetic. If you have other approaches to teaching this topic, please share! Just use the comment box below!

Multiplication of Fractions
Visualize and practice multiplying fractions using an area representation. With the “Show Me” option selected, the virtual manipulative is used to graphically demonstrate, explore, and practice multiplying fractions. A rectangular grid, representing a whole, shows the areas of two fractions to be multiplied, one fraction in red on the left and another in blue at the bottom. The area of the overlapping region, shown in purple, represents the product of their multiplication. The “Test Me” option provides problems to be solved using the same graphical representation.

Multiplying Fractions
This tutorial site offers instruction as well as practice in multiplication of fractions. The fractions are modeled with either circles or lines (rectangular areas). The visual display matched with the numerical makes an effective demonstration.

Divide and Conquer
This lesson is based on the idea that middle school students can better understand the procedure for dividing fractions if they analyze division through a sequence of problems. Students start with division of whole numbers, followed by division of a whole number by a unit fraction, division of a whole number by a non-unit fraction, and finally division of a fraction by a fraction. Activity sheets and guiding questions are included.

Dividing Fractions
In this activity, students divide fractions using area models. They can adjust the numerators and denominators of the divisor and dividend and see how the area model and calculation change. Full access to ExploreLearning is available through an annual subscription, but you can apply for a month’s free access in order to test out the applets.

Fraction Bars
This applet offers a classroom-adaptable idea of how to explain division of fractions. Adjustable colored bars are used to illustrate arithmetic operations with fractions on the number line. The initial seeding shows a division problem, dividing 7/5 by ½.


We Want Your Feedback
We want and need your ideas, suggestions, and observations. What would you like to know more about? What questions have your students asked? We invite you to share with us and other readers by posting your comments. Please check back often for our newest posts or download the RSS feed for this blog. Let us know what you think and tell us how we can serve you better. We appreciate your feedback on all of our Middle School Portal 2 publications. You can also email us at msp@msteacher.org. Post updated 11/08/2011.

Fractions: Adding and Subtracting

As teachers, we all want our students to understand those concepts underpinning addition and subtraction of fractions— the concept of equivalent fractions, in particular. These resources offer teaching ideas on both the concepts and the skills, including demonstrations of addition and subtraction as well as problems for practice. I looked hard for material that would visually or interactively engage middle school students. If you have ideas to share on how you teach these operations, please use the comments area to put them online.

Visual Fractions
An exceptional tutorial on fractions, including step-by-step, illustrated explanations of addition and subtraction. Both circle and line models help students visualize the operations with like and unlike denominators. Interactive problems allow students to use these visual models as they figure the numerical answers.

Adding Fractions
Students must do the usual exercise of finding equivalent fractions with common denominators, but here the fractions are represented visually as portions of a square. Once the computer checks that the fractions are correct, students can drag the representations into a third box and enter the sum of the fractions. This is a real learning experience!

The Fractionator
Created by math teacher Jeff LeMieux, the site offers online and offline tools to help students understand fractions. The online tools use unit squares to model two fractions to be added (or subtracted) and then create equivalent fraction models; with this visual aid, students complete the operation. They can request a new problem for each exercise or enter the two new fractions themselves. Also provided are links to printable materials.

Soccer Shootout
Practice time! Students can practice the addition and subtraction of fractions at levels of difficulty ranging from Easy to Super Brain. Students play against the computer and are provided with a full solution when a wrong answer is entered.

Classic Middle-Grades Problems for the Classroom
The king finds a bowl of mangoes and eats 1/6 of them; the queen eats 1/5 of the remaining mangoes; the prince eats 1/4, etc., until only 3 are left. How many were in the bowl to begin with? A complete lesson plan is given, including activity sheets. A thought-provoking problem to cap this work on fractions!


We Want Your Feedback
We want and need your ideas, suggestions, and observations. What would you like to know more about? What questions have your students asked? We invite you to share with us and other readers by posting your comments. Please check back often for our newest posts or download the RSS feed for this blog. Let us know what you think and tell us how we can serve you better. We appreciate your feedback on all of our Middle School Portal 2 publications. You can also email us at msp@msteacher.org. Post updated 11/10/2011.

Close Encounters with Ratios

Understanding ratio and proportion, one of NCTM’s Focal Points for grade 7, presents a real challenge for all levels of middle school. Here are classroom-friendly ways to explore the topic from several angles. Each involves visuals or hands-on activities that bring students into close contact with the abstract concept of ratio. Let other teachers hear your ideas on teaching this topic! Post a comment below.

Constant Dimensions
In this carefully developed lesson, students measure the length and width of a rectangle using standard units of measure as well as nonstandard units such as pennies, beads, and paper clips. When students mark their results on a length-versus-width graph, they find that the ratio of length to width of a rectangle is constant, in spite of the units. For many middle school students, not only is the discovery surprising but also opens up the whole meaning of ratio.

Discovering the Value of Pi
Students measure the diameter and circumference of several circles, using a handy applet, record their data, and reach conclusions about the ratio of circumference to diameter. A genuine guided exploration!

Math-Kitecture
Math-Kitecture is about using architecture to do math (and vice versa). Activities engage students in doing real-life architecture while learning estimation, measuring skills, proportion, and ratios. In Floor Plan Your Classroom, for example, exact directions are set out and illustrated on how to make a copy to scale of your classroom.

What’s My Ratio?
What would happen to a picture in the pocket of someone who is shrunk or enlarged? This question hooks students into a study of similar figures. As they compare the measurements of corresponding parts of pictures that have been either decreased or increased in size, they can investigate concepts of similarity, constant ratio, and proportionality.

Figure and Ratio of Area
A page shows two side-by-side grids, each with a blue rectangle inside. Students can change the height and width of these blue rectangles and then see how their ratios compare — not only of height and width but also, most importantly, of area. The exercise becomes most impressive visually when a tulip is placed inside the rectangles. As the rectangles’ dimensions are changed, the tulips grow tall and widen or shrink and flatten. An excellent visual experience!

Capture-Recapture: How Many Fish in the Pond?
To estimate the number of fish in a pond, scientists tag a number of them and return them to the pond. The next day, they catch fish from the pond and count the number of tagged fish recaptured. From this, they can set up a proportion to make their estimation. Hints on getting started are given, if needed, and the solution explains the setup of the proportion.

Size and Scale
This is a challenging and thorough activity on the physics of size and scale. The final product is a scale model of the Earth-moon system, but the main objective is understanding the relative sizes of bodies in our solar system and the problem of making a scale model of the entire solar system. The site contains a complete lesson plan, including motivating questions for discussion and extension problems.

Scaling Away
For this one-period lesson, students bring to class either a cylinder or a rectangular prism, and their knowledge of how to find surface area and volume. They apply a scale factor to these dimensions and investigate how the scaled-up model has changed from the original. Activity sheets and overheads are included, as well as a complete step-by-step procedure and questions for class discussion.


We Want Your Feedback
We want and need your ideas, suggestions, and observations. What would you like to know more about? What questions have your students asked? We invite you to share with us and other readers by posting your comments. Please check back often for our newest posts or download the RSS feed for this blog. Let us know what you think and tell us how we can serve you better. We appreciate your feedback on all of our Middle School Portal 2 publications. You can also email us at msp@msteacher.org. Post updated 4/03/2012.

More Than Just Practicing the Facts

Middle school students often need to practice basic facts. The web sites listed below get the students thinking about the operations in a problem-solving way. In the first resource, the problem can have more than one solution, challenging students to practice their skills in reasoning and proof. A possible follow-up would be to have the students make their own problems, provide solutions, and share the problems and solutions with classmates.

Middle School Balanced PacketNSDL Annotation
This web site contains the techniques, tips, and secrets used by master teachers of mathematics. Tips for students, teachers and parents are included.

Learning to MultiplyNSDL Annotation
Teachers share their methods for teaching multiplication facts.

Learning Multiplication FactsNSDL Annotation
Dr. Math of the Math Forum web site offers ideas on teaching multiplication.

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Let us know what you think and tell us how we can serve you better. We want your feedback on all of the NSDL Middle School PortalNSDL Annotation publications. Email us at msp@msteacher.org.