Wetlands

At one time wetlands were known only for being the mosquito-breeding grounds they can be. Thus, management practices included eliminating the wetland altogether. It is now known that wetlands have at least three useful functions for human inhabitants: pollutant filter, flood mitigator, and site of exceptional biodiversity compared to adjacent dry land areas. How can educators convey these important concepts to students? Here are some web sites to supplement your content knowledge and to complement your lesson repertoire for educating students about wetland and estuary value and conservation practices.

USGS National Wetlands Research CenterNSDL Annotation
This home page contains links to publications, maps and data, and a section titled “About Wetlands” and enhanced with photographs. Among the Hot Topics listed is a link to information about the changing wetlands of Louisiana in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

Estuaries.gov
Explore this web site to learn more about estuaries, how to protect them, and the EstuaryLive interactive field trips. Visit this site often for updates on EstuaryLive broadcasts and ways that you can participate.

Environmental Concern
This nicely organized page contains several links of interest in its left navigation bar, including Educator Training, Schoolyard Habitats, and Wetland 101 Online.

Ducks Unlimited Canada
Three wetland and environmental education units with lesson plans, called the Wetland Ecosystems series, are found at this site. The units were developed by teachers to meet Canadian curriculum requirements in the life sciences.

Wildlife at the Olentangy River Wetland Research Park
Here you can find photos of wildlife typical of most Midwestern and Northeastern wetlands in the United States. This is part of a more comprehensive site devoted to wetland research.

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