Boggs’ Favorite Middle School Math Activities

The latest Math Forum Newsletter contained information about Rex Boggs, an international math middle level math educator. He has made accessible his all-time favorite middle school math activities — all freely downloadable. You can get to all of this content by clicking here. Boggs’ flipcharts come in two versions: annotated PDFs; and fully interactive .flipchart files, which require Promethean ActivInspire.

When not teaching middle school math, which he has done for 40 years in schools from New York City to Papua New Guinea, Boggs moderates the Technology in Maths Education User Group, tinspire Google Groups discussion, and math-learn Yahoo! mailing list — each featured in these pages before.

You can subscribe to the weekly Math Forum Newsletter by clicking here.

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We want and need your ideas, suggestions, and observations. What would you like to know more about? What questions have your students asked? We invite you to share with us and other readers by posting your comments. Please check back often for our newest posts or download the RSS feed for this blog. Let us know what you think and tell us how we can serve you better. We appreciate your feedback on all of our Middle School Portal 2 publications. You can also email us at msp@msteacher.org.


Amazing New Collection of Hands-on, Interactive Resources

The Lawrence Hall of Science at the University of California, Berkeley, has launched an online collection of hands-on, interactive resources to help informal educators in nonclassroom settings, such as museums and science centers, engage school-age children in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology learning. The web site is called howtosmile.org.

The web site provides both an enhanced faceted and a visual search capability; list-making features that provide a public or private online space to collect favorite activities and add teaching tips and ideas on how to use an activity; user-contributed videos, and other creative community functions that encourage users to rate and comment on activities. Some activities are available in Spanish. Special activity collections target those with limited mobility and individuals who are vision impaired. Built using open source tools, howtosmile.org also includes an open infrastructure to allow institutions to contribute links to useful activities and a free widget to embed howtosmile.org search results on any web page.

We Want Your Feedback
We want and need your ideas, suggestions, and observations. What would you like to know more about? What questions have your students asked? We invite you to share with us and other readers by posting your comments. Please check back often for our newest posts or download the RSS feed for this blog. Let us know what you think and tell us how we can serve you better. We appreciate your feedback on all of our Middle School Portal 2 publications. You can also email us at msp@msteacher.org. Post updated 4/12/2012.

Speaking in Math Terms

—————————–“Words! Words! Words!” sang Eliza Doolittle in the musical My Fair Lady. “I’m so sick of words!” But students have to master the vocabulary of mathematics. This is especially difficult for those learning a new language even as they struggle with new mathematics vocabulary. The first two resources deal with mathematical terms themselves, while the other three offer classroom activities in Spanish and English.

A Maths Dictionary for Kids
This animated, interactive mathematics dictionary for kids explains over 500 common mathematical terms in simple language. Each term is illustrated and, often, accompanied by an interactive applet that makes visual and immediate the definition of the term.

Terms and Formulas from Beginning Algebra to Calculus
This interactive mathematics dictionary offers many terms and formulas appropriate for older middle school students. The illustrations, diagrams, and applets help define the terms every bit as much as the text does.

Biblioteca Nacional de Manipuladores Virtuales
This is the Spanish equivalent of the National Library of Virtual Manipulatives. Together they offer interactive, web-based virtual manipulatives, mostly in the form of Java applets, for mathematics instruction. On any page, users can easily switch between English and Spanish by using a drop-down menu.

Multicultural Math Fair
Here are ten activities used successfully in a math fair at Frisbie Middle School in Rialto, California. Each activity is available in English and Spanish. Links connect the teacher to information on setting up a fair and locating software.

Who Wants Pizza?/Quien Quiere Pizza?
A fun way to learn about fractions in English and in Spanish. Four activities, each followed by practice exercises, lead students to explore the basic definition of fractions and addition with fractions.


We Want Your Feedback
We want and need your ideas, suggestions, and observations. What would you like to know more about? What questions have your students asked? We invite you to share with us and other readers by posting your comments. Please check back often for our newest posts or download the RSS feed for this blog. Let us know what you think and tell us how we can serve you better. We appreciate your feedback on all of our Middle School Portal 2 publications. You can also email us at msp@msteacher.org. Post updated 4/03/2012.

Area and Volume

Here are online resources with virtual manipulatives that can help make area and volume real for students. Be sure to check out the sites these resources are from — the sites contain many other interesting and useful mathematics learning resources.

Area Explorer
With this simulation, the student finds the areas for irregular shapes on a grid. Answers are checked and a table displays the perimeters and areas. The instructor page contains exploration questions to use to investigate the relationship between area and perimeter.

How High?
This virtual manipulative simulates pouring a liquid from one container to another container with different dimensions and the same or different shape. Students determine the volume of the liquid in the first container and predict the height of the liquid in the second. The container can be a cylinder, tank, or cone.

Neighborhood Math
Two of this site’s printable lessons, Math at the Mall and Math in the Park or City, feature hands-on activities where students use area or volume to explore their actual neighborhood.

Patios: Does Bigger Perimeter Mean Bigger Area?
This activity challenges students to think about the relationship between perimeter and area. Students must use a little ingenuity to find the dimensions of the tiles used to build two patios with the same area, but different shapes.

Scaling Away
In this hands-on lesson, students find the dimensions of a rectangular prism or cylinder and create a larger scale model of the same shape. After calculating surface areas and volumes, students draw conclusions about the relationship between surface area and volume.

Three Dimensional Box Applet: Working With Volume
Students create boxes by using their mouse to indicate how much of each corner should be cut from a grid. The dimensions of the box and its volume and surface are generated by the applet

We Want Your Feedback
We want and need your ideas, suggestions, and observations. What would you like to know more about? What questions have your students asked? We invite you to share with us and other readers by posting your comments. Please check back often for our newest posts or download the RSS feed for this blog. Let us know what you think and tell us how we can serve you better. We appreciate your feedback on all of our Middle School Portal 2 publications. You can also email us at msp@msteacher.org. Post updated 4/04/2012.