Linking Math to Real Problems

Why bother with statistics in middle school? One answer: data analysis is one of the NCTM Standards and an 8th grade Focal Point. But even more important, in my experience, is that statistics links math to real problems.

Working Hours: How Much Time Do Teens Spend on the Job?
This activity challenges students to interpret a bar graph, showing only percentages, to determine the mean number of hours teenagers work per week. A more complicated and interesting problem than it may seem at first glance!

Train Race
In this interactive game, students compute the mean, median, and range of the running times of four trains, then select the one train that will get to the destination on time. Their goal is to find the most reliable train for the trip.

The Global Sun Temperature Project
This web site allows students from around the world to work together to determine how average daily temperatures and hours of sunlight change with distance from the equator. Students learn to collect, organize, and interpret data. You will find project information, lesson plans, and implementation assistance at the site.

Down the Drain: How Much Water Do You Use?
In this Internet-based collaborative project, your students share information about water usage with other students from around the country and the world. Based on data collected by their household members and their classmates, students will determine the average amount of water used by one person in a day. Students must develop a hypothesis, conduct an experiment, and present their results.

100 People: A World Portrait Detailed Statistics
You’ve heard the idea before: What if the whole world were represented by 100 people? It is mind-boggling, for example, to realize that 61 would be from Asia and only 5 from North America. This page gives a full list of the data collected, links to a lesson plan and to commentary on the statistics. Excellent for an interdisciplinary project!

If you’d like to focus attention on measures of central tendency, these last two sites help explain the mean and the median though interactive online practice.

Plop It!
Users click to easily and quickly build dot plots of data and view how the mean, median, and mode change as numbers are added to the plot. An efficient tool for viewing these statistics visually.

Comparing Properties of the Mean and the Median Through the Use of Technology
This interactive tool allows students to compare measures of central tendency. As students change one or more of the seven data points, the effects on the mean and median are immediately displayed. Questions challenge students to explore further the use of these measures of center; for example, What happens if you pull some of the data values way off to one extreme or the other extreme?

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We Want Your Feedback
We want and need your ideas, suggestions, and observations. What would you like to know more about? What questions have your students asked? We invite you to share with us and other readers by posting your comments. Please check back often for our newest posts or download the RSS feed for this blog. Let us know what you think and tell us how we can serve you better. We appreciate your feedback on all of our Middle School Portal 2 publications. You can also email us at msp@msteacher.org. Post updated 11/29/2011.

Hands-On Measuring

Students need active learning experiences to understand measurement concepts and develop important skills. These resources provide opportunities for students to problem solve with hands-on and virtual measurements in real-world and online environments.

The Global Sun Temperature Project
Bigger than hands-on, this is an annual real-world, international and interdisciplinary research project for students. Classes gather local data, post data online, and use the aggregated data to see how average daily temperatures and hours of sunlight relate to distance from the equator.

It Takes Ten
Students use metric units to estimate and measure weight, length, and volume, and to determine area.

Open-Ended Math Problems: Get Ready, Get Set
Select a month and scroll down to find open-ended measurement problems at three levels of difficulty. Students build mathematics understanding and see how mathematics is used in everyday life.

Pentagon Puzzles
This measurement lesson is one of 37 hands-on projects focused on mathematics. See http://www.math.nmsu.edu/~breakingaway/lessons.html for more lessons.

Popcorn Math
Here is a volume estimating activity for students to do on their own or with others.

Surface Area and Volume
Examine prisms from multiple views, adjust dimensions, rotate prisms, and see how dimension changes impact volume and surface area. Students can also calculate volume and surface area.


We Want Your Feedback
We want and need your ideas, suggestions, and observations. What would you like to know more about? What questions have your students asked? We invite you to share with us and other readers by posting your comments. Please check back often for our newest posts or download the RSS feed for this blog. Let us know what you think and tell us how we can serve you better. We appreciate your feedback on all of our Middle School Portal 2 publications. You can also email us at msp@msteacher.org. Post updated 11/08/2011.

Theoretical and Experimental Probability

Middle school students need opportunities to think about probability to understand the meaning of taking a chance. These resources support the active development of the concept of probability and the appropriate use of related mathematics terminology.

Adjustable Spinner
This simulation demonstrates the difference between experimental and theoretical probabilities. It is easy to run a number of experiments.

Data Management: A Look at Leisure Activities
Use the navigation on this site to select appropriate class activities. Students collect and analyze data and can look at differences between experimental and theoretical data when rolling a die.

Introduction to the Concept of Probability
This lesson is a good way to build on students’ innate understanding of probability. It includes teacher information, student activities, and definitions of key terms.

Random Drawing Tool – Independent Trials
This applet enables students to run experiments to examine and better understand theoretical and experimental probabilities. See the related lesson Boxing Up at http://illuminations.nctm.org/LessonDetail.aspx?ID=L448.

The Smithville Families
This printable lesson uses Pascal’s triangle to build student understanding of theoretical probability. The lesson explores the probabilities for the births of boys and girls in a large family. The outcome of a coin toss is used to indicate the birth of a boy or a girl.


We Want Your Feedback
We want and need your ideas, suggestions, and observations. What would you like to know more about? What questions have your students asked? We invite you to share with us and other readers by posting your comments. Please check back often for our newest posts or download the RSS feed for this blog. Let us know what you think and tell us how we can serve you better. We appreciate your feedback on all of our Middle School Portal 2 publications. You can also email us at msp@msteacher.org. Post updated 11/07/2011.