Common Core Mathematics Standards Resources

The Common Core State Standards for mathematics are still quite new. Many educators still have lots of questions about what they are going to look like in practice and how teaching and learning might change to accommodate them. An October 2010 newsletter from Education Northwest answers the following questions: What do teachers need to know about the Common Core State Standards (CCSS)? How will they affect teaching and assessing mathematics and English language arts? What are the benefits and what can teachers do now to prepare for implementation?

Additional resources specific to mathematics include:

The Common Core State Standards: Mathematics
Mathematics standards define what K–12 students should know and be able to do in math. While they are grade-specific, the standards do not define the intervention methods or materials necessary to support students who are well below or well above grade-level expectations.

CCSS Model Course Pathways in Mathematics
Achieve (in partnership with the CCSS mathematics-writing team) convened a group of experts to develop Model Course Pathways in Mathematics based on the CCSS. Four model course pathways were created, each of which is intended to significantly increase the coherence of high school mathematics courses.

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Common Core Standards Implementation [1.5mb PDF File]
The adoption of the CCSS could have significant implications for teachers. NCTM has prepared a PowerPoint presentation to inform teachers and to support them in implementation of the standards.

We Want Your Feedback
We want and need your ideas, suggestions, and observations. What would you like to know more about? What questions have your students asked? We invite you to share with us and other readers by posting your comments. Please check back often for our newest posts or download the RSS feed for this blog. Let us know what you think and tell us how we can serve you better. We appreciate your feedback on all of our Middle School Portal 2 publications. You can also email us at msp@msteacher.org. Post updated 4/18/2012.

Making a Prediction

Middle school students need opportunities to examine how probability can be used to make predictions and sound decisions. These resources will engage students in real-world applications of probabilistic thinking.

Game of SKUNK
With this lesson, students examine choice versus chance and practice decision-making skills using the outcome probabilities when playing the game of SKUNK.

She Always Wins, It’s Not Fair!
This is the perfect activity to use when introducing the concept of fair and unfair games.

Lotto or Life: What Are the Chances?
Teachers interested in astronomy or in working with a science class will find this lesson offers an out-of-the-ordinary way to investigate outcomes based on probability.

A Statistical Study on the Letters of the Alphabet (CEC)
Students examine letter usage and make decisions based on data. This lesson can be developed as an interesting language arts connection.

Sticks and Stones
Students gather data when playing Sticks and Stones, an Apache game, to determine the average number of moves necessary to win the game.

Tree Diagrams and Probability
A tree diagram is a perfect way to make probability visual. In this lesson, students use tree diagrams and explore fair and unfair games based on the outcomes of car race trials.

What Are the Odds?
Use the navigation column to find background information, lesson plans, and student activities focused on the use of probability.


We Want Your Feedback
We want and need your ideas, suggestions, and observations. What
would you like to know more about? What questions have your
students asked? We invite you to share with us and other readers
by posting your comments. Please check back often for our newest
posts or download the RSS feed for this blog. Let us know what
you think and tell us how we can serve you better. We appreciate
your feedback on all of our Middle School Portal 2
publications. You can also email us at msp@msteacher.org. Post
updated 11/29/2011.